Trailer Park Unschoolers

Because you don't need to be rich to unschool!


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Back to School (or Not)

It’s that time of year again, when my Facebook feed blows up with kids going back to their first day of school, sometimes their first day in general, other times their first day in a new grade.  This time last year I was getting ready to send my own kids back to school, which wouldn’t last out the year for Sander and Beekee.  Now I’m only gearing up to send one back to school, Corde, and she’s not even sure she wants to last out the year.

For Corde, this year is basically a big experiment.  She’s going to do the career exploratory at the local tech school, and if she likes it, she may stay on long-term.  We may also look into working out a deal where she can homeschool for her academics and go to school for the technical training.  We’re still not sure what we want to do for that, but it at least gives her an idea of what she can do for a career, so it’s worth it.  She’s going to get a chance to try some things and hopefully narrow down what she wants to do with her life, and as a result, where she wants to go to college and what she studies when she gets there.

For the other three, this is a time of getting back into it.  We’ve been doing phonics and math through the summer, but for the fall we’re adding some workbooks that the kids actually enjoyed doing, now that we won’t have the distraction of Corde at home.  There are this series of workbooks that are listed as Daily (Subject).  The kids really like these books because it’s a short (10 minute or less) delve into a topic.  Last year Sander and Beekee did Daily Geography and Daily Science.  Beekee also did Daily Reading Comprehension, which I think Sander is going to do this year as well.  Since the kids like it, I don’t see why we wouldn’t keep doing them, for now at least.  If they enjoy it, why not?  Even if it really is curriculum, it’s still unschooling if it’s fun, right?

I’m sticking with the math and phonics.  These are really just core subjects that the school can use as measurable goals to make sure the kids are on track.  Their reading and math levels really matter when it comes to the school system, so I’m trying to keep them “on track.”  Sander needs to be reading and reading independently, which is an important milestone for the schools.  Once he’s doing that we can slack off a bit there.  Besides, some of the work is kind of fun, so that’s something.  Sander gets to color and enjoys reading all the new books with Primary Phonics, and some of the exercises in Explode the Code seem to be kind of fun.  It’s not the most “unschooler” approach to things, but I want to make sure we’re at least toeing the line on this one.  And the math?  The kids seem to enjoy doing the math with the blocks (even if some of it is more playing than doing their problems), and they’re doing pretty good with the exercises.  If I can get them through to the point of being “ahead” in math they can definitely slack off in that department.  Again, it’s just enough to keep the school system happy, and they’re making good progress (and having fun with it) so why not?

But history we’re definitely taking a more “unschooling” approach.  The kids liked Story of the World, so we’re going to start on Story of the World Vol 2 in the first few weeks of the school year.  I’m going to be ordering it early into the year.  We’re also going to be reading a lot of fairy tales, just for the fun of it.  You can learn a lot about a culture from their fairy tales.  We’re hopefully going to end the year with a trip to the Renaissance Faire in the spring, though that all depends on us getting a car.  We’re probably also going to talk about swords, archery, and other cool stuff like that.  You can’t start the middle ages without talking about that cool stuff.  And, just for the fun of it, we’re going to add playing Skyrim to the curriculum.  It’s not exactly an accurate portrayal of history in any means, but it does introduce concepts like armor, weapons, and castles.  We can find some cool videos online about siege weapons and there are more than a few on armor.  This is a period of history I absolutely love learning about, so we’re going to have some fun with it.  We may even throw in learning to make chainmail (or any of the numerous spellings), just for the fun of it.  Why not?  Oz knows how to make it.  It may be a bit too hard for Luca, but Sander and Beekee are definitely old enough to put together a simple piece of jewelry.  Best part is it gives Oz and I reasons to get back into some stuff we really love, which is never a bad thing.

And what about science, you may ask?  I had planned on ordering a science “curriculum” with lots of experiments for the boys to do, but I think I may just order a book of experiments to do at home.  I think we’re going to make sure we do everything scientifically, from forming a hypothesis to developing a conclusion.  Thankfully this is my home, so a conclusion of “That was really awesome!” counts as far as I’m concerned.  Well, that and a few details about what happened.  I’m expecting to record these answers for them and keep the “lab reports” in a big binder so the kids can all review what we’ve done later.  Maybe we’ll pick up some science kits at some point in the year, but for now we’re planning on keeping it simple.  We may also look into getting one of those snap circuit kits so the kids can learn about circuitry and that kind of thing, but I think sticking with stuff we can do with household goods, even if it’s not stuff we have readily on hand and have to purchase, sounds like the best place to start.

And, finally, on the essential skill of writing, I’m hoping we can get a letter writing thing going on.  Luca and Sander have a half brother they haven’t yet met, but lives almost clear across the country from them.  I’m hoping Oz can convince his mom to let them start writing letters.  I’m also going to be talking to my aunt (their great aunt) about maybe doing a letter exchange/penpal thing.  It’s a great way to get good at writing, but it’s also always fun to get stuff in the mail.  That’s going to do the boys a lot of good, even if they only send out one letter every other week or so.  It’s skill building, and something they’ve all expressed interest in doing.

Not only will they be doing letter writing, but Sander and Beekee both have asked about doing more writing projects.  Beekee wants to learn to write well so he can go to college some day.  Sander wants to learn to write stories.  Both of them have agreed to work on a paragraph a week, then maybe illustrating their paragraph, just for fun.  We’ve decided (while the kids have interest at least) we’re going to pick a topic every week (or more often if they choose to) and all three will get to write about it.  Sander and Beekee will work on doing a paragraph (maybe more for Beekee) and Luca will get to write a sentence.  They’re all really excited about this.  I plan to put this in each of their portfolios so they have a collection of work for the end of the year to look back on.  This will allow us to have dated samples of their work, should we be asked for it in the future, but also it’s a really cool way for them to look back at their writing skills.  Hopefully this will help Sander build into a creative writer, and teach Beekee the skills he’s going to need to write college papers, even if he’s still a ways away from having to do that yet.

I’m pretty excited about this year.  We’ve got some cool stuff we want to do in history and science.  We’ve got some daily lessons to keep the kids busy.  We’re making progress in math, which we’re blowing through the lessons faster than I expected.  Phonics is coming along pretty well, which means Sander will be reading independently before long and Luca will be reading in no time.  We’ll have plenty of pieces of work to put together in a portfolio, and tons of new experiences on the way.  I have a feeling Corde’s going to be sad she’s being left out, but she’s got half the year to decide what she wants to do.  Who knows?  Maybe all the fun the kids are having will inspire her to come home and join the fun too?  Or maybe school will be really awesome for her.  Either way, it’s going to be a wild year!

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When They Grow Up

I have to admit, I’ve been a little worried about my kids and their interests.  So many homeschooled and unschooled kids are doing incredible things.  They’ve got incredible interests and they really invest themselves in what they’re into.  It’s almost like they know what they want to be when they grow up.

My kids aren’t like that.  They don’t really play with LEGOs and build things very often.  They only build their own houses in Minecraft.  I can’t get them to do all the cool, creative things other kids do.  They’ve got no interest in playing music.  They really don’t want to do anything but play video games and watch Minecraft videos on Amazon.  All in all, their interests seem like they’re not all that diverse.

For Luca, I’m not really worried about that.  Luca is only five and is primarily interested in coloring, playing with toys, and having tea parties.  This is no big deal.  It’s age appropriate for Luca to have no special interests or any leaning towards what he’ll do as a grown up.  Crazy ideas are normal at that age.  Luca’s current dream job is to make teddy bears, which is a possibility when he grows up, but we’ll start with teaching him how to sew.  If he hates that, he’s never going to make it as a teddy bear maker.

I know Corde, the closest to being out of the house and on to the real world, is having problems with this herself.  She’s going to a STEM oriented program at a local community college right now, which she doesn’t hate, but she doesn’t want to be doing any of that as a career.  Her discovery is 3D printing is hard, coding makes her head hurt, and engineering isn’t her thing.  It’s not a total loss.  She’s having a good time with it in spite of it not being her thing, but she knows it’s not going to be her future.  At least she tried it and now knows she can rule out engineering jobs in her future.  I just wish she had more of an idea of what she does want to do.

Of course, I can’t truly say that.  Corde’s got thoughts of possibly wanting to be a detective or a lawyer.  She’s been toying with the idea of being a chef for years.  She hasn’t really pursued the idea of cooking at home, though she’s got an opportunity to do it through the local voc/tech.  It’s something, and she really should have some direction in her life, given she’s so close to being out in the world.

But what about Beekee and Sander?  They need to have some direction in life too.  I mean, they’re both still young and have time to figure out what they want to do with their lives, but it’s better they at least have something they’re passionate about.  If nothing else, it’d be nice if they had some things they wanted to try.

So I finally broke down and asked them today, what would they like to do when they grow up.  If I knew that much I could help guide them to their passions.  We could get on board with the unschooling thing again because we’d have somewhere to start.  They’d do something other than play Minecraft all day and watch movies.  I mean, I know that’s part of deschooling, but the state is going to want to see they’re doing something educational with their time.

Beekee was the first one to respond.  First he said he wanted to make mods for Minecraft.  I told him that was a great goal, but what if he couldn’t make a living that way?  He might want to have another plan for his future, just in case modding Minecraft turns out to not be profitable.  He settled upon making a new game console, preferably one that could play the games of more than one system on it.  Then he got into talking about how he’d like to get into stuff that falls under the heading of “electronics”.  Well, that’s definitely a direction he could go.  Electrical engineering is totally a job option for him when he gets older, and not a bad choice when it comes to income either.

Sander’s first thought was he wanted to make video games.  He decided that might be hard and might not be as fun as it seems, so if he doesn’t like making video games he wants to be “a worker”.  When I asked what that meant, the answer was someone who builds things, like houses.  I can totally see Sander getting into that when he’s older.  He’s a sturdy, strong kid that likes doing physical things.  I can see him having the creativity to make video games too, but right now I think that takes a level of patience he’s yet to master.  He has a lot more patience with physical, hands-on stuff.  That may just be his age, but it may also be what he’s cut out to do in life.  He’s talked about building houses on and off for the past couple of years, so maybe this really is a passion of his.

These are things we can work on now, and I feel pretty good about that.  We can start working on getting the kids started with electronics.  We can do a little bit of programming, if I can find some stuff that’s age appropriate.  And we can definitely start working on some wood crafting projects.  I work at a home improvement store.  I’m sure we can come up with something!

I have to say, I feel a lot better about my parenting skills.  I think it was just they weren’t ready to think about it.  I’d asked several times and they never really were interested in thinking about it and whenever I brought up ideas, they’d brush it off and go back to playing.  Now it looks like we’ve got some good places to start.  They’re finally ready to get into some pretty cool stuff.

So, we may not know what they want to be when they grow up, but at least we’ve got some ideas to start with.  Maybe they’ll love what they’ve chosen as life aspirations now.  Maybe they’ll try it and hate it.  Whatever it is, at least I’ve got kids that are starting to get passionate about things.  We’re back on the unschool train for real!


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Science Means Yogurt

Yesterday we started the process of making yogurt as a part of our summer activities.  I almost said “homeschooling” then wanted to correct it to “unschooling”, but the truth is it’s really just living.  I guess that’s what unschooling is about.

It was bright and early in the morning (and by that I mean 8:30) that we got up and went over to our neighbor’s house.  It all started with reading the ingredients list on the yogurt container as a starter.  We talked about the different bacteria, and how the bacteria aren’t bad germs, even though they are germs.  The kids thought that was pretty cool.  Our only regret is not having a microscope to view the bacteria with.  That would have been cool.

We talked a bit about what makes an “active culture”.  Our neighbor was funny about it.  She had the kids pretend to be inactive if it was too cold to do anything, then they all jumped around the room when they were the “active” culture at the right temperature, then got sluggish and slow again when the temperature got too hot.  It was a great way to show the kids the difference between active cultures and inactive ones.  I never would have thought of doing it that way.  As much as I teach kids, I really don’t teach kids.  I teach as though I’m talking to adults.  Our methods really differ, but I think that’s a good thing.  It’s good for the kids to learn from different teaching styles.

After that each of the kids got to pour some of the milk into a giant pot.  We heated the pot to 180 degrees (to kill all other possible bacteria sources), then waited for it to cool down to 120 before we added the yogurt culture.  In the mean time the yogurt was mixed in with some of the milk that had been set aside and cooled so it would be liquid enough to mix in with the other milk.  We called this the “mother culture.”

Of course, when I think of “mother culture” I think of a book I read last summer, Ishmael.  It was a good read, but “culture” was viewed as a cage, trapping people from having real and meaningful experiences with each other and the world around them.  The idea of “mother culture” made me laugh because in my head that was not a good thing, but I suppose it fit.  We were “infecting” the milk with this “mother culture” to make something new, so I was amused.  I think we may end up reading Ishmael when the kids get a little older, or when we become more accustomed to reading together.

After the yogurt had cooled enough, we mixed the “mother culture” in with the yogurt to make our yogurt.  The kids quickly put all of the yogurt jars onto the table at the center of a towel, which was wrapped around them so the yogurt cultures could stay warm and do their magic.

That’s when the hard part came, the waiting.  We ended up going back there today to check out the yogurt because it would have been done too late for the kids to go check on it.  The yogurt was put up in the refrigerator to wait for them to check it out.

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Luca was super excited to make the yogurt, but was the only one who didn’t want to try it.  It was a little more runny than the neighbor had hoped, but about par for the course for commercial yogurts, from everything I could tell.  Here Luca is telling us all about the yogurt and what it looked like.

I’m seriously considering looking into a yogurt maker.  I know we can make it without one, but I would feel a little happier with one.  We can always get some fresh berries and things to mix in with the yogurt, and smoothies would definitely be a good thing to add in.  I bet even Luca would love a strawberry smoothie with fresh yogurt.  It’s something to look forward to doing in the future.

As for today, I’m posting this while I’m home from work.  Luca was restless last night for the second night in a row, so I got no sleep.  Luca wanted me to stay home today, so I did.  Hopefully Luca will get settled and follow a regular sleep routine soon.  As you can see from the picture, we’ve started to keep Luca’s hair up too.  We just found out Luca’s hair is long enough to French braid, and with keeping up the routine of brushing any time Luca eats anything this helps keep hair out of the way for that too.

Also, up and coming, Luca is getting a special present for his surgery ordeal.  More on that when it arrives…  And Luca’s birthday is coming up.  Poor kid lost all those teeth just as a birthday was coming up!  It’s okay, though.  It just means we’ve got to make sure Luca gets an awesome present for being so brave.  On top of that, Luca got $20 from the tooth fairy for all of that.  It’s been an ordeal, but awesome is on it’s way.


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Reading Is Hard…

Sander has been having the most difficult time with reading.  It’s been a challenge for him for quite some time, which is why I pulled him out of school.  They were teaching him whole word reading, which wasn’t helping him any when he encountered words he didn’t know.  It was a frustrating experience for him, so we decided to do something different for him.

Now we’re working on phonics.  It’s already made such a difference in how Sander reads.  It’s not the natural “when he discovers it” kind of experience I’d hoped for, but we’re trying to keep with state standards.  We don’t read together as often as we should, and most of our reading is the easy readers as a part of the Primary Phonics workbook set, but we’re getting there.  He’s building the skills he needs to read, which is the general idea of it anyway.

Today we read one of the Rookie Reader series.  As much as I love the idea of those as beginner readers, they’re really not so easy.  I’ve come to discover that many “beginner” readers have a lot of really challenging words, several with multiple syllables.  They’re not exactly easy reads for a kid that’s just learning to read, which makes it challenging, especially for Sander who is definitely a reluctant reader, if you want to throw a label on it that way.  He finds those books really challenging, which makes enjoying the time reading them that much harder.

One of the problems Sander has with reading is sounding things out.  He tries, but he keeps mixing up the sounds and adding sounds where none exist.  This leads to the frustrating challenge of trying to straighten him out and getting him to read only the letters that exist and in the right order.  It’s really hard to have patience with him while he struggles through.  I’d almost rather read to him instead of watch him struggle to figure it out and get frustrated.  While the whole word method of reading made him equally as frustrated, I think phonics and sounding things out are equally frustrating for him, though he’s definitely making more progress this way.

I have to admit, it also helps that I’m not the best about getting him to read either.  We’ve been known to skip whole days instead of working with it every day.  I don’t feel like fighting with him for daily reading is really going to help him love reading, even if it’s going to make his reading skills that much better.  It’s hard to be motivated to push my kids to do things they really don’t want to do.  I don’t see it as necessary.  I guess this ties back to the days when we used to be pure unschoolers, something I really hope we can get back to as my confidence with working with the system grows.

In the mean time I’ve gotten a lot better at reading to the kids before bed.  Luca doesn’t last long through the stories.  Generally halfway through the chapter I have a sleeping Luca on my lap.  Sander isn’t a huge fan of reading stories before bed, which doesn’t help things much, though I think it’s because he’s just not a fan of Peter Pan.  I think if we were reading a story he was more interested in, that would help.  We’ve talked a bit about what comes next and we’ll see what we end up doing.  We’re halfway through Peter Pan (which isn’t surprising as it’s not an overwhelmingly long book), so we’ll be on to another book soon.

I know reading aloud to the kids isn’t really helping Sander with his reading skills, but I can’t help but think it may eventually increase his love of books.  If I can read stories he really gets into I’ll be able to inspire his love of books.  If he loves books he may be motivated to work on his own reading skills so he can get the stories without having to wait for me to get around to them.

Isn’t that really how unschooling works, though?  You inspire your kids to get into things because you expose them to those things.  Your kids want to read because they learn books are enjoyable.  That’s how you unschool reading.  They learn to read because the words show up in their video games and they want to be able to read it on their own.  They learn to read because they get tired of having to wait for someone else to read everything for them.  They learn to read because it’s a useful skill, not because it’s something they have to do.

Of course, that backfired with Corde.  She just wanted me to read everything for her.  “Reading is boring,” she still says even now, but she would listen intently whenever I would read a story aloud.  She’s a bit old to enjoy read aloud stories, but she still hasn’t gotten that spark of wanting to read on her own.  She’s started reading Coraline and hasn’t gotten past the first chapter, and she’s been working on it for a almost two weeks.  I honestly think she’s never going to take to reading.  She much prefers to watch Netflix or play silly little games on her phone.  At least texting is making her spelling improve.

Luca, on the other hand, has really taken to reading.  It’s frustrating because Luca wants to read everything, but doesn’t have the skills to actually read any of it.  It’s frustrating for Luca because he wants to read the same as the rest of the kids.  It’s doubly frustrating for me because I have to explain to Luca that, until he can develop the skills himself, I still have to do the reading.  In the end it would all be so much easier if Luca would learn to read.  I have a feeling once Luca learns, nothing will stand in that kid’s way!

Beekee is much more of a reader than Sander and Corde.  He can sit for hours reading on his own, though given the choice he would rather play video games or watch television.  I’ve taken to instituting reading time during the day so that Sander and Beekee have to read.  Once Corde is home, that’s when she’ll do her summer reading.  Beekee really seems to like this time, though he does have a tendency to just look at the books rather than actually reading them.  At least the idea is there.

This all brings me back to Sander.  I’m not sure how I’m going to help him become a reader.  Maybe if I keep picking up Kindle edition books that will help.  I like the Kindle edition books because I can download them as many times as I like and they take up no physical space to store.  If the kids want to read them when they get older I can always get them their own Kindles to load up with all their favorite stories.  That may be what it takes to get Sander interested in reading.  The challenge then is picking out books that he’ll really enjoy.  Peter Pan is not a win, in spite of the adventures and everything else.  I think it’s far too wordy and not enough action.

If anyone’s got suggestions, I’m all ears.  I’ve already decided we’re going to do Percy Jackson, Harry Potter, and likely the Mrs. Peregrine’s Home for Extraordinary Children.  We’re definitely going to read Coraline.  I just don’t know where to go from there, maybe the Redwall series.  There are too many options and I’ve got to admit, I’m not up on what kids are reading these days.


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Little Artist and Growing Greens

Let me first say that I’m so happy with Luca.  For the longest time all Luca’s pictures were pretty much scribbles.  I was starting to think there may be some kind of developmental delay or something.  So far as I’m aware kids have usually graduated beyond scribbles by the time they’re entering kindergarten.  Luca is almost there and still everything is scribbles instead of proper drawings.

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This is the picture I was given by Luca today.  This is “Bear”.  It actually looks like something.  I had only ever seen one face before, but this is a whole person.  I absolutely love this little picture.  I love that he does the eyes like empty orbs too.  There’s something I find so endearing about it.  I can’t help but be a proud mama after looking at the pictures I’ve gotten today.  Maybe Luca isn’t so impossibly behind on artistic talent as I worried he would be.

Then there’s the garden.  Well, I hesitate to call it a garden.  It’s only a handful of plants on our porch, but it’s doing pretty well for itself.  Everything is growing.  I’m not sure how much bounty we’re going to get this year, but it’s at least something that looks nice and will hopefully yield at least some tomatoes for Corde to chow down on.

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Everything is growing so well.  Those tomato plants were at least half the size when I brought them home, perhaps smaller than that.  The two closest to the house are smaller, but I think that has to do with getting less afternoon sun.  These ones are doing fantastically.  One of my tomato plants even has it’s first flower!  It’s so exciting!

And the strawberries already produced three strawberries.  I wasn’t really sure the tiny blobs they produced really counted as anything, since they were so small and misshapen, but apparently they were actual strawberries.  One of them managed to go bad within a day of it getting ripe.  One was stolen.  The third went bad and dropped off the plant just recently.  I think I’m going to have to keep a better eye on those plants.  Growing strawberries is completely new to me.

I’m going to have to invest in some kind of animal repellent too this year.  Last year we had a number of tomatoes, but they were all consumed by squirrels and left half eaten on the railing.  I don’t want to see my tomatoes go to waste like that again.  I’m not here to feed the squirrels!  Hopefully this year we’ll have better luck.

So that’s been our day in the 90 degree weather we’re having.  We’re just trying to chill and enjoy it for what it is.  We may call it before the public schools let out this year.  We’ve certainly been working hard enough at it!


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Absences

Yeah, I’ve been away a while again.  This happens.  I just got a new job working weekends so I’ve been incredibly busy.  I’m working Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, and cramming about 20 hours into those three days.  It’s a lot of time on my feet and it’s really exhausting.  I’m in a garden center, so my job seems to be “plant mover” more than anything else.  I’m learning a lot, but it’s definitely not an easy way to make a buck.

There is some good to this whole working thing, though.  I was able to get some plants for our porch container garden this year.  It’s nowhere near as epic as last years, but it’s something.  We’ve got eight tomato plants, nine strawberry plants in a strawberry planter, and a little container of watermelon plants.  I’m not expecting to get much from the garden this year.  I’m guessing we’ll get enough tomatoes for Corde to eat straight from the vine.  Hopefully she can get them before the squirrels do this year.  We’ll probably get a handful of strawberries, not enough to do anything fancy with.  I wouldn’t be surprised if we don’t get any watermelons at all.  We didn’t last year.  Still, we’ve got our little garden going, and that’s something we can be pretty proud of.

This is Luca singing to “all the beanies” last year.  That’s a pretty good view of all of our garden at the time.  It got even bigger than that.  Most of what we grew didn’t end up producing much, which wasn’t so great, but it was fun to work on it.  Unfortunately, being a container garden, there wasn’t much for the kids to do.  There was no weeding or anything of that nature.  It’s pretty much just watering the plants and letting them grow.

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This is our happy little porch garden now.  We’ve got two patio tomatoes, two “Lemon Boy” tomatoes, and a handful of cherry tomatoes of different colors.  In the corner is our blackberry bush, which isn’t doing much yet.  You can also see the terracotta strawberry planter I got last year.  We tried some bare root strawberry starters last year, but they didn’t do anything.  This year I went with actual plants.  Apparently you’re supposed to put a tube of PVC piping down the center with holes drilled in it to spread the water better.  I have no idea about that.  We’re just rolling with it the way it is.  It’s not a huge expanse of garden, but it’s something.  Oh, and there’s a serano pepper (maybe?) in there along with a start of an apple tree, though who knows what’s going to happen with that.

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Luca’s favorite part is the strawberry planter.  As you can see we’ve gotten a good bit of rain, so I haven’t had to water any of it yet, but it’s looking pretty good.  You can see two white little strawberries forming.  Those were on the plant before I even got it.  Luca was so funny about it too.  “What?  You got me white strawberries?  Really?”  I had to explain that strawberries don’t start out red.  They become red as they ripen.  This will make a lot more sense when the strawberries actually ripen.  We’re excited to see some new strawberry blossoms appear when they do.  It’s going to be a learning experience because I’ve never grown strawberries before.

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This is Luca’s favorite part, the little starts of strawberries beginning to form.  It’s something we’re definitely going to be watching in the future.  These were like that when we got the plant, so we have no idea how long it takes to go from flower to here, but it’s something to keep an eye on.  It’s exciting to see the start of berries already being on some of the plants.  I didn’t see them when I picked out the plants.  To be honest, I just threw nine plants into a tray and hoped for the best.  It looks like we got some plants that were at least healthy enough to do something.

And this is Luca checking out the plant to see if there are any new strawberries to tell us about. This was on Friday before going to the doctor.  As you can see, it was rainy and gross.  Luca had to borrow Sander’s raincoat.  Don’t ask me how but somehow we’ve managed to get by without having any raincoats.  This one was sent to us by Great-Grandma and hasn’t seen much use.  I really should get us all some decent rain gear though, even if we don’t use it much.  Anyhow, Luca enjoys looking for strawberries.  Once the tomato plants are a bit bigger, I think looking for tomato blooms is going to be a thing as well.

That’s one thing I can say about all this.  The kids are going to get a chance to learn about growing things by watching things grow.  Unfortunately they’re not able to see it come up from seed, but some day.  I’m not much in a place to seed start right now.  Not only that, but I just can’t see myself doing it with so little space to actually garden.  I wish we had a place with an actual garden plot.

And speaking of places we wish we were, currently Oz is looking at getting back into the military.  He’s got some old tickets to pay off before he can get back in.  It’s not an ideal life, but it would give us a chance to do a little bit more and would open up our budget.  So everyone, wish us luck with doing it.  We’re going to need it!


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The Things My Kids Don’t Know

We’ve been following through with Story of the World, and the kids discovered that Anansi is just a really cool character.  They absolutely loved the story of Anansi.  So what does this have me doing?  As a good mother I go to the library website and request every story known to man with Anansi…because I’m that mom…

It got me thinking about something I hadn’t even realized I’ve never done with the kids.  We’ve never read Aesop’s fables.  We’ve also never done Just So Stories.  These were so much of a factor in my own life that I can’t believe we haven’t done anything with them.  They are living proof that (to some degree) I am a failure as a mom.  How can I neglect these things that were such a part of my own childhood?

I’ve already realized that my kids were growing up in a weird little bubble when I realized my kids don’t know how to sing Twinkle, Twinkle or The Wheels on the Bus.  I’d never taught them to sing Do Your Ears Hang Low.  We never sang any of the classic kids songs.  For that matter, we rarely sing as a family.  The only one we regularly do is On Top of Spaghetti, which Luca insists on me singing at least fifty times over when we’re walking to or from jujitsu.  I really need to brush up on some other fun songs because that one’s getting kind of old.  (Of course, it might help if I actually remembered the other three versus, so that’s a thing.  Luca would probably find that MUCH funnier.)

But my kids really do seem to live in a bubble where they don’t know the traditional stuff kids know at their age.  I mean, how many kids Sander and Luca’s age are studying history?  I find it not at all a problem that they don’t know how to sing those childhood songs every other kid seems to know.

And as Sander’s bus drives by the house, I’m reminded again why I’m so glad he’s home.  I don’t have to worry about him getting off the bus at 4pm, then still having homework to do, and being too tired to do it.  Jujitsu wouldn’t even begin to be an option if he was in traditional school.  He wouldn’t be home for more than an hour and a half before I had to bustle him back out the door!

I digress…what was the point I was making?  Oh, yes, that my kids don’t know the stuff I knew when I was their age.  I guess that makes me feel that my kids are growing up with a weird existence.  I’m not raising them on a healthy diet of children’s songs and things like that.  The kids hardly watch television (aside from Luca who binges like nothing else), and we don’t listen to the radio tons, so they don’t get a whole lot of that poured on them.  They live in this weird state of reality that was so much different than my life growing up.

Yet I can’t help but feel their lives are somehow lacking because these really cool things haven’t been explored by them.  They haven’t learned about Aesop’s Fables or read the Just So Stories.  Now they’re being introduced to Anansi, which is the closest they’ve come to any of that.  While those stories are really cool, we’re just now getting to them, and those were the only ones.  We need to incorporate more of that into our learning time, I think.  The kids would probably dig that kind of stuff.

At the same time, the things my kids have been learning are pretty awesome.  They’ve gotten to watch a garden grow last year.  They’ll be seeing it again this year.  We’re going to be spending time in nature as soon as the weather gets warm, and we’re going to start making note of the things that indicate the change of seasons once Daylight Savings hits and we’ll still have light when we go to jujitsu.  We’re delving into a lot of history, which is great for the kids and they’re really digging into it.  These are things I thought were pretty cool when I was a kid and it’s great to see they’re enjoying it as much as I do.  They’re really getting to experience some awesome things that way.

It isn’t too late to introduce the kids to things I feel are missing in their lives.  Aesop’s Fables will continue to be around.  I’m sure I can find a free ebook with them on Kindle.  The Just So Stories can be gotten from the library, I’m sure.  Since we’re homeschooling there are far more options to bring them up as a part of our homeschooling activities, and I no longer have to worry about Sander getting off the bus at 4 and not being interested in doing anymore school related anything after that.

Now we’ve got this incredible opportunity to fix what I feel like is a major failing in raising my kids (at least the younger three).  I still have time to get them knowledgeable about the things they don’t know, things that I’ve come to understand most kids don’t know anymore.  It’s a chance to open up a world to them that they’d never even known to consider before.  I have a feeling we’re in for a really great experience.